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Denver Gold and Silver Exchange -->  Silver Bullion
Denver Gold and Silver
5475 Leetsdale Dr Suite 210
Denver, Colorado 80246

Main Number: 303-333-1411

Cash for Gold and Silver 
 
Main Number: 303-333-1411

Monday - Thursday 9 am to 6 pm
Sunday from 10 am to 2 pm

We Carry Prospector's Gold and Gems .999 ounce Silver Loaf in 1,2,3,4,5, and 10 ounce bars

1 0z 999 Silver Round - 40th [1929-1969] Anniversary Commercial Aviation Albuquerque

  • 100 ounce Engelhard bars .999 Silver
  • Buffalo .999 Silver Rounds
  • and other .999 Silver rounds

 

Bullion

A metal is deemed to be precious if it is rare. The discovery of new sources of ore or improvements in mining or refining processes may cause the value of a precious metal to diminish. The status of a "precious" metal can also be determined by high demand or market value. Precious metals in bulk form are known as bullion and are traded on commodity markets. Bullion metals may be cast into ingots or minted into coins. The defining attribute of bullion is that it is valued by its mass and purity rather than by a face value as money.
Purity and mass

The level of purity varies from issue to issue. "Three nines" (99.9%) purity is common. The purest mass-produced bullion coins are in the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf series, which go up to 99.999% purity. Note that a 100% pure bullion is impossible, as absolute purity in extracted and refined metals is asymptotically approached. Historically, coins had a certain amount of weight of alloy, with the purity a local standard. The Krugerrand is the first modern example of measuring in "pure gold"; it should contain at least 12/11 ounces of at least 11/12 pure gold. Still more bullion coins (for example: British Sovereign) state neither the purity nor the fine-gold weight on the coin but are recognized and consistent in their composition, and many historically stated a denomination in currency (example: American Double Eagle).

 

 

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