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Denver Coins --> Gold & Silver Coins --> History of Gold --> Precious Metals

  • Platinum is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River." It is in Group 10 of the periodic table of elements. A dense, malleable, ductile, precious, gray-white transition metal, platinum is resistant to corrosion and occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits. Platinum is used in jewelry, laboratory equipment, electrical contacts and electrodes, platinum resistance thermometers, dentistry equipment, and catalytic converters.
  • Rhodium is a chemical element that is a rare, silvery-white, hard and chemically inert transition metal and a member of the platinum group.
  • Gold is a chemical element with the symbol Au (from Latin: aurum, "shining dawn", hence adjective, aureate) and an atomic number of 79. It has been a highly sought-after precious metal for coinage, jewelry, and other arts since the beginning of recorded history. The metal occurs as nuggets or grains in rocks, in veins and in alluvial deposits.
  • Iridium is the chemical element with atomic number 77, and is represented by the symbol Ir.
  • Osmium is a chemical element that has the symbol Os and atomic number 76. Osmium is a hard, brittle, blue-gray or blue-black transition metal in the platinum family, and is the densest natural element.
  • Palladium is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pd and an atomic number of 46. Palladium is a rare and lustrous silvery-white metal that was discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston, who named it after the asteroid Pallas, which was named after the epithet of the Greek goddess Athena, acquired by her when she slew Pallas.
  • Rhenium is a chemical element with the symbol Re and atomic number 75. It is a silvery-white, heavy, third-row transition metal in group 7 of the periodic table. With an average concentration of 1 part per billion (ppb), rhenium is one of the rarest elements in the Earth's crust. The free element has the third-highest melting point of any element, exceeded only by tungsten and carbon. Rhenium resembles manganese chemically and is obtained as a by-product of molybdenum and copper refinement. Rhenium shows in its compounds a wide variety of oxidation states ranging from -1 to +7.
  • Ruthenium is the chemical element with the atomic number 44, and is represented by the symbol Ru. It is a rare transition metal of the platinum group of the periodic table; and like the other metals of the platinum group, ruthenium is chemically inert to most other chemicals. The Russian scientist Karl Klaus discovered the element in 1844 and named it after Ruthenia, the Latin word for Rus'. Ruthenium is found associated with platinum ores. Ruthenium is a minor component in these ores and therefore is a relatively rare element. Most ruthenium is used for wear-resistant electrical contacts and the production of thick-film resistors. Another, minor application of ruthenium is its use in some platinum alloys.
  • Germanium is a chemical element with the symbol Ge and atomic number 32. It is a lustrous, hard, grayish-white metalloid in the carbon group, chemically similar to its group neighbors tin and silicon. Germanium has five naturally occurring isotopes ranging in atomic mass number from 70 to 76. It forms a large number of organometallic compounds, including tetraethylgermane and isobutylgermane.
  • Beryllium is the chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4. A bivalent element, beryllium is found naturally only combined with other elements in minerals. Notable gemstones which contain beryllium include beryl (aquamarine, emerald) and chrysoberyl.
  • Silver is a metallic chemical element with the chemical symbol Ag (Latin: argentum, from the Indo-European root *arg- for "white" or "shining") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it has the highest electrical conductivity of any element and the highest thermal conductivity of any metal. The metal occurs naturally in its pure, free form (native silver), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a by-product of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.
    • Gallium 19000 ppb $425/kg[9] $413/kg
    • Indium 250 ppb $325/kg[9] $520/kg
    • Tellurium 1 ppb $158.70/kg
    • Mercury 85 ppb $18.90/kg $15.95/kg
    • Bismuth 8.5 ppb $15.40/kg $18.19/kg
 

 

 

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